Market your graphic designs

Items you will need

  • Business card
  • Online portfolio
  • Website
Step 1Determine your target market so you can tailor marketing efforts to client needs. Providing wedding graphic designs is different from providing design solutions for small businesses. Tailor your marketing efforts accordingly.

Step 2Gather your best designs and create a professional portfolio to show during client meetings. Create sample designs as spec pieces if you don’t have previous work to show. Keep your target market in mind as you do so. Include invitations, save-the-date cards and wedding programs to brides-to-be. Include logos, business cards, brochures and letterhead designs for business owners.

Step 3Create a website or online portfolio to market your graphic designs locally and outside of your area. Use websites such as Coroflot, DeviantArt or Wobook to host an online portfolio or purchase a web domain and hosting through sites such as GoDaddy, Yahoo Small Business or BlueHost.

Step 4Design a logo to represent your graphic design business. Create business cards to promote your services. Include a brief listing of services provided, contact information and the web address of your online portfolio.

Step 5Join local business associations to introduce your designs to your community. Partner with local businesses who do not compete with your brand but whose clientele is a part of your target market.

Step 6Create a direct-mail campaign using postcards you can design yourself. Provide in these an introduction of yourself and your services, and advise recipients on how to contact you. Send these cards to members of the local business community or purchase direct-mail lists online.

Step 7Attend community events and offer to donate your graphic services. You can create a brochure, event program or logo.

http://smallbusiness.chron.com/market-graphic-designs-16396.html

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Back to the basics

20130713-193755.jpgIt’s always a good idea to go back to the basics. That’s exactly what I need during my designers block frustrations. I contemplated whether I needed a graphic design book because the Internet has so much information! But, I’m a little over reading on web all day and I wanted to flip pages. I may not be able to zoom into the pictures like I do on the iPad, but the texture and smell of a textbook I kinda miss. =P I also miss the basics of graphic design. So, I browsed through the pages of “Design Basics Index” by Jim Krause at my local Books-A-Million. I actually judged this book from it’s copyright date, 2004, and I wondered if a 2004 graphic design could be outdated by 2013. Another book I looked at that was published in 2010 was very eye catchy and maybe double the size of Design Basics. I guess that’s sort of like judging book by it’s looks, so I really read into these books; a little here and there per section, per chapter, per cover. Design Basics was the perfect fit because is has exercises scattered through the book and it was just the whole package with good and bad examples. It was about making conscious decisions and not just placing that logo in the corner just because it looks good. I needed more reason in my designs because I was kind of designing to things that looked cool. Then, I couldn’t get myself out of that initial design. That means I ran out of ideas. So, the basics will definitely refresh my brain on my community college practice. The university doesn’t let you practice all that much, which I hope changes for the better. I’m looking forward to evolving.